Dee Dee Myers will leave job as Warner Bros.’ head of corporate communications

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Dee Dee Myers attends TheWrap's Power Women Summit-Day 2 on Nov. 2, 2018 in Los Angeles. The former White House press secretary will step down as Warner Bros. head of communications on April 1.

Dee Dee Myers attends TheWrap’s Power Women Summit-Day 2 on Nov. 2, 2018 in Los Angeles. The former White House press secretary will step down as Warner Bros. head of communications on April 1. (Presley Ann/Getty Images/TNS)

Dee Dee Myers, head of corporate communications at the nearly century-old movie and television studio Warner Bros., has announced she is leaving her role after five years.

Once the inspiration for the hit show “The West Wing” character C.J. Cregg (portrayed by Allison Janney) after her years as White House press secretary for President Clinton, Myers joined the Burbank-based studio in 2014 to steward communications for one of Hollywood’s biggest entertainment companies. She reported to former Warner Bros. chief executive officer Kevin Tsujihara.

She leaves her role as executive vice president for worldwide corporate communications and public affairs for Warner Bros. Entertainment in a bit more than a month, and a search for her replacement will be launched.

“We faced our share of long days, late nights and heart-stopping headlines,” Myers said in a memo to colleagues Monday. “I will leave on April 1 with only the fondest memories – and a trunk full of swag.”

Myers led the Warner Bros. press office through upheaval at the studio, now part of WarnerMedia, including last year’s ouster of Tsujihara after allegations of sexual misconduct and the takeover by AT&T.

Tsujihara was replaced by former BBC executive Ann Sarnoff, who was appointed as the studio chief, its first female chief executive officer. Myers will continue to work on her various board seats, including that of Wynn Resorts.

Myers was the first woman to hold the position of White House press secretary. She was an adviser to Aaron Sorkin in his writing of “The West Wing” and wrote a book called “Why Women Should Rule the World.”

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